Psychology General Education Courses

The psychology classes listed below may be taken for General Education (GE) credit by non-psychology majors.

For a complete listing of GE requirements and classes visit the university Academic Advisement Center. Opens in new window

 PSYC 101: Introductory Psychology (GE area D.1)
Basic concepts, problems, and methods in psychology. Perception, learning, measurement, cognitive processes, development, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior, physiological and social psychology. Research participation or required. It is recommended that students satisfy the ELM requirement before enrolling.

PSYC 110:Reasoning and Problem Solving (GE area A.3)
*This is the only GE Psychology class that Psychology majors may use for GE credit.
The nature of critical thinking, models and strategies; common fallacies of reasoning, self-regulation in the thinking process; application of critical thinking to specific areas.

PSYC 312: Psychology of Human Sexual Behavior (GE area E)
Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Topics in human sexual behavior integrating sexuality as biological, social, clinical, and developmental aspects of sexuality. Surveys and statistics of sexual behavior, sexual orientation, gender identity, sexual variations, causes and treatment of sexual dysfunctions. Legal, moral, and social issues.

PSYC 322: Psychology of African Americans (GE area D.5, Z- Spring 2018 and prior, GE area D.4, Z- Fall 2018 and later)
Prerequisite: completion of the G.E. Category D.1. Uses psychological principles and practices to guide students’ comprehension of life as an African American. Introduction to a holistic perspective that expands ways of conceptualizing psychology from an African American world view. (Same as AFAM 322.)

PSYC 331: Psychology of Personality (GE area D.5- Spring 2018 and prior, GE area D.4- Fall 2018 and later)
Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Research, theory and assessment techniques in the area of personality. (This course presents a general survey of research and theory in the area of personality, including personality dynamics, methods of assessing personality, social and biological influences on personality, personality development, etc. Although some discussion of clinical theories of personality [e.g., Freud, Rogers, Sullivan] will be included, in general the course will focus on the normal personality rather than on psychopathology.)

PSYC 341: Abnormal Psychology  (GE area D.5- Spring 2018 and prior, GE area D.4- Fall 2018 and later)
Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Symptoms, causes, treatment and prevention of mental problems; anxiety disorders, personality disorders, psycho-physiological disorders, psychoses, substance use disorders, sexual disorders and organic disorders.

PSYC 346: Asian American Psychology  (GE area D.5, Z- Spring 2018 and prior, GE area D.4, Z- Fall 2018 and later)
Prerequisite: completion of G.E. Category D.1. In-depth analysis of major issues in the Asian American community from a psychosocial perspective, including ethnic identity development, generational conflicts, the “model minority” myth, interracial relationships, attitudes toward mental health services and alternative healing/therapeutic approaches. (Same as ASAM 346)

PSYC 351: Social Psychology (GE area D.5- Spring 2018 and prior, GE area D.4- Fall 2018 and later)
Prerequisite: PSYC 101. How people think about, influence, and relate to one another. Topics include social perception and cognition, attitudes and attitude change, attraction altruism, aggression, interpersonal influence, and group processes. (The course stresses social interaction and how the individual responds to his or her environment. Much attention is given to research findings).

PSYC 361: Developmental Psychology (GE area E)
Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Theories, methods and research findings regarding physical, cognitive and psychosocial human development, including such topics as perception, learning, intelligence and personality.

PSYC 362: Psychology of Aging (GE area E)
Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Characteristics of humans during the adult years. Topics include physical, intellectual, cognitive, personal, social and psychological development, vocational and family changes, retirement and death.